Instructing Future ERLs #erl13

Lori Duggan (Indiana University) gave an inspirational and well-structured overview of proposing, planning and teaching a course on ERM at Indiana University. Duggan was inspired herself by a 2010 ERL presentation by Grogg and Flemming, which pointed out the lack of courses and training in this area. Feedback from Indiana University staff supported the idea that training in this are is needed and wanted in the profession. Duggan created a program outline and proposed to program director.  Here are some of the details of her course development:

SCOPE — doesn’t cover collection development or ERL cataloging, as these are already covered in other core courses. So what makes ERM unique? Discover and user perspective, while important, not within Duggan’s domain. Workshop format, which was 18 hours of total class time.

AUDIENCE — not strictly for ERLs but for a variety of library professionals working in reference cataloging or collection development.

PREREQUISITES — none.

COURSE STRUCTURE — 90 minute Lecture Tuesday, Discussion Thursday. Also a lab portion with Serials Solutions offering a demo site option.

6 WEEK OUTLINE — Intro, Acquisitions/Vendor/Consortia, License/Negotiation, Access/Mgmt (Lab portion), Preservation/Archiving, Evaluation/Usage Data

TIME —  Decided Summer after FY rollover was best, although later she regretted losing her summertime.  She proposed the idea in the Fall, then had syllabus ready by Jan so it could be advertised to teach Summer.

SIZE OF CLASS – 9 students (1 audit).

ASSESSMENT — overall positive, was able to get students’ plus/delta reflections that went beyond standard student evaluation form. Current material relevant as was the fact that it was taught by librarian working in the field. Also like practical assignments. Actually wanted more group assignments.

Duggan observed that she had more content than expected and more questions from students than expected. Did take a lot of prep time to develop the course and for the teaching. She advises to explore a research leave option, if this is something that interests you.

 

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  1. March 27th, 2013

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